City science we can’t get enough of

Manchester is a vibrant, busy city, full of all sorts of things to love – not least a thriving scientific community. Here, we’ve collected a few choice bits of city science – from regular events, days out to engaging science blogs, Manchester is jam-packed with amazing scientific treats for the whole family – so why not have a look!


Live science events: Manchester regulars.

Bright Club: The thinking person’s variety club! Bright Club blends comedy, science, music, history and anything else that can happen on stage. – Find their events calendar here.

Cafe Scientifique Manchester: This is a place where, for the price of a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, anyone can come to explore the latest ideas in science and technology. Events take place at 6pm on the last Wednesday of every month in Kro Bar on Oxford road. To find out more visit their website.

Didsbury Scibar: This free event offers a range of topics to entertain even the most picky science dabbler. Evenings provide a relaxed informal atmosphere where you can listen to experts discuss the latest scientific research in the comfort of a local pub. Event info can be found @Didsburyscibar


Scientific days out:

indexMuseum of Science and Industry (MOSI) – An exploration of where science and industry meet and the modern world begins: With permanent galleries spread across five historic listed buildings exploring topics as varied as early textile machinery to modern x-ray equipment MOSI has it all. An exciting and enlightening day out for the whole family – to find out more and to plan your visit, see the MOSI website.

index1Jodrell Bank Discovery Center and Observatory: Space, the final frontier – Manchester even has this covered. At Jodrell Bank you can explore the wonders of the universe and learn more about the workings of the giant Lovell Telescope. Situated in the gorgeous Cheshire countryside, Jodrell Bank is a guaranteed great day out for all the family. To learn more and plan a visit see the website.


Manchester Bloggers and Podcasts we love:

The Brain Bank: The Brain Bank is run by a group of scientists from Manchester, all of whom share a desire to communicate the amazing complexities of science with anyone interested enough to listen. With a wide range of interesting topics, the Brain Bank has a little something for every science dabbler. Find them here.

Manchester Faculty of Life Sciences Podcast: A fortnightly update on the most recent and exciting biological discoveries. Find archives and new material here.

Why Infinity: Science – Infinite questions about life and everything around us. A really interesting blog from a current Manchester student which attempts to answer some of the many questions members of the public have about science. To find out more, visit the website here.

Ancient Egyptian Animal Bio Bank: Breathing new life into the study of animal mummification: OK, so this one is a bit niche, but has some really interesting stuff on the University’s Egyptian Animal Bio Bank project and research on the rituals and processes behind mummification. Take a look here.

Anomalous Distractions – A protein crystallographer opines about science, pseudo-science and academia: skeptical, opinionated and at times quite technical, but overall a really good read. To find out more see here.

The Aperiodical: A place to enjoy maths – this one certainly doesn’t shy away from the technical, but, for anyone with a mathematical background, this is a great read. To have a look round visit the site here.


 To add your event, attraction or blog to our list, contact the webmaster on britsciassoc@manchesterscience.co.uk

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